Show Ring Secrets Directory

Erinrac.com

check here for more great dog articles

all these articles are copyright but most may be reproduced, check here for more information

GETTING THE PERFECT STACK

this article by: Jan E Irving

. Getting and holding the perfect stack seems to have become a sport rewarded with those magical wins for some. It is particularly essential if you happen to have a judge who can only make awards based on the 'stack' - the pose.
Working up from babyhood, you will discover your dog can learn all sorts of neat tricks, but I must confess, in my case, I have usually taught them to jiggle or move.
One case in point, I have been recently working on, is the boy who knows I once had a piece of bait in the cup of my hand, and he wasn't daft, that particular hand was under his jaw. So to get to it, he'd lean back and duck his muzzle down. OK, I figured it out, and don't show him with bait now. Yet, there has also been a learning curve for him, Clumbers have excellent elephantine memories.
So if you come across this 'trick' with your girl, just be calm and persevering. I nearly said patient, but persevering may be more accurate.
Have her stand still before moving on to anything else; even if you only get that microsecond, then 'release' her with "OK".
When you get a bit more advanced you can say 'good girl' and have her hold that pose too, 'OK' being the word that says "right, now you can move"
I invariably manage to teach my dogs "good girl' means wee, or as a general release - stick to using "OK"!
Remember to be calm and consistent in your language, you spent ten or twelve years at school learning the intricacies of the English language, your dog has not had the benefit of such a long and persistent education.
Make life simple for yourself and your dog, "Good girl" is praise and can be used at anytime you so desire, "OK" is the release word from the exercise you have chosen to do with your dog. And don't forget to use it, otherwise you'll be as guilty as the characters in Dumb-bell of Brookfield who left their English Setter on point in a storm only to go back the next day to find their precise dog frozen to death. =
.